Early Bird Pricing And Registration For 2019 BAY To Ocean Writers Conference

Registration at early bird rates opens October 1, 2018, for the 2019 Bay to Ocean Writers Conference, a popular annual event that sells out quickly every year. This gem of a conference takes place Saturday, March 9, 2019 at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills, Maryland.

Early bird pricing runs for only two months this year, from October 1 to November 30, 2018, so don’t delay registering. Do it today!

Each year writers come to learn, network, and be a part of the premier educational seminars presented by the Eastern Shore Writers Association. Featuring dozens of accomplished authors, poets, film writers and other instructors, this one-day event draws writers from all across Maryland and nearby states. Register early to enjoy time-limited early bird rates.

Early Bird Pricing (Oct. 1 – Nov. 30, 2018): ESWA Members: $95 and non-members: $130 (Includes annual membership in ESWA, which costs $35)

Regular Pricing (after Nov. 30, 2018) Members: $105 and Non-members: $140 (Includes annual membership in ESWA, which costs $35)

Student Pricing: $55

There will be scholarships given to six students. More to follow on this. To Register and further information visit: www.https://www.easternshore writers.org/Bay-To-Ocean-Conference. Share links from www.facebook.com/BaytoOcean

Six Local Women To Be Honored At Fannie Lou Hamer Awards Reception

— Chosen from across Anne Arundel County, six trailblazing women will be honored during the 23rd annual Fannie Lou Hamer Awards Reception, held Sunday, Oct. 7, at 4 p.m. at the Frances Scott Key Auditorium at St. John’s College in Annapolis, Md.

The reception celebrates the late civil rights heroine, Fannie Lou Hamer, as well as local civil rights heroes. Known for impacting their community through social justice or community outreach, each woman made a lasting mark on the Anne Arundel County community. Each of this year’s honorees—Amy Cruice, Argo Duenas, Leah Frazier, Vickie Gipson, Erika Johnson, and Kathleen Johnson—join the ranks of more than 100 notable women, including former Senator Barbara Mikulski.

Of note are Argo Duenas and Kathleen Johnson: Duenas is a military veteran and the first African American woman to establish a holistic health and wellness center in Annapolis. Kathleen Johnson, like Hamer, was one of the original marchers in the 1963 March on Washington, and continues her social activism to this day—even in her eighties. Other special guests will include Congressman John P. Sarbanes,; Mayor Gavin Buckley; Annapolis Alderwoman Elly Tierney; and St. John’s College President Panayiotis Kanelos.

A buffet reception will immediately follow the program. Tickets are $35 in advance, and will also be available at the door, with proceeds benefiting the Civil Rights Foot Soldier Memorial in Annapolis. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 301.538.6353 or 443-871-5656 or e-mail arankin58@hotmail.com. Contact Facebook pages; MLKMD or Carl Snowden for event details.

The event is sponsored by the Martin Luther King Jr. Committee of Anne Arundel County and co-sponsored by St. John’s College. Many previous winners will be in attendance and recognized. Other invited special guests include Congressman Anthony Brown; Senator Chris Van Hollen; Senator Ben Cardin; and Maryland House Speaker Michael Busch.

Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-1977) was an American voting rights activist, civil rights leader, and philanthropist. The awards that bear her name recognize women from various racial backgrounds who, while not necessarily household names, have excelled in their chosen fields while working diligently to improve civil and human rights in the region.

Hamer was the last of 20 children born to Mississippi sharecropper parents. She was instrumental in organizing Mississippi Freedom Summer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and later became the vice-chair of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, attending the 1964 Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City, N.J., in that capacity.

Erika Johnson of Annapolis is an alumna of Morgan State University (MSU) in Baltimore. While at MSU, Johnson developed the idea for the mentoring program, Pretty Girl Academy (PGA), Inc., designed to help teenage girls achieve personal goals throughout the school year. Attendees are taught to recognize their own beauty and self-worth.

Erika Johnson of Annapolis is an alumna of Morgan State University (MSU) in Baltimore. While at MSU, Johnson developed the idea for the mentoring program, Pretty Girl Academy (PGA), Inc., designed to help teenage girls achieve personal goals throughout the school year. Attendees are taught to recognize their own beauty and self-worth.

Kathleen Johnson, of Laurel, retired from the Rutgers University Library as a business administrator. Johnson is a member of the Anne Arundel West County Democrat Club and has participated in several of the club’s campaigns. Age is no obstacle for Johnson: Although she is more than 80 years old, Johnson recently helped campaign for the Maryland House of Delegates. election in 2018

Kathleen Johnson, of Laurel, retired from the Rutgers University Library as a business administrator. Johnson is a member of the Anne Arundel West County Democrat Club and has participated in several of the club’s campaigns. Age is no obstacle for Johnson: Although she is more than 80 years old, Johnson recently helped campaign for the Maryland House of Delegates. election in 2018

 Leah Frazier of Crofton is an attorney and mother, and has lived most of her life in Anne Arundel County and is a proud graduate of Annapolis High School. Frazier works at the Federal Trade Commission in the Bureau of Consumer Protection, where she focuses on financial services. She also serves as an organizer with We Persist–Women of Greater Anne Arundel.

Leah Frazier of Crofton is an attorney and mother, and has lived most of her life in Anne Arundel County and is a proud graduate of Annapolis High School. Frazier works at the Federal Trade Commission in the Bureau of Consumer Protection, where she focuses on financial services. She also serves as an organizer with We Persist–Women of Greater Anne Arundel.

Vickie Gipson, a longtime resident of Annapolis, is an attorney and an advocate for social change and justice and has worked with the Caucus of African American Leaders, the Anne Arundel County Branch of the NAACP, the Martin Luther King Jr. Committee, and various other local community and social justice organizations. Currently, she is a candidate for judge of the Anne Arundel County Orphans Court.

Vickie Gipson, a longtime resident of Annapolis, is an attorney and an advocate for social change and justice and has worked with the Caucus of African American Leaders, the Anne Arundel County Branch of the NAACP, the Martin Luther King Jr. Committee, and various other local community and social justice organizations. Currently, she is a candidate for judge of the Anne Arundel County Orphans Court.

Amy Cruice, of Annapolis is the legal program manager and director of the Know Your Rights training program for the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland. (ACLU-MD). Beyond her work with the ACLU, Cruice works with the Caucus of African American Leaders and Eastport Working Together, volunteers for the South Sudan Hope Network, tutors ESL at Esperanza Center, and participates in the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Team.

Amy Cruice, of Annapolis is the legal program manager and director of the Know Your Rights training program for the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland. (ACLU-MD). Beyond her work with the ACLU, Cruice works with the Caucus of African American Leaders and Eastport Working Together, volunteers for the South Sudan Hope Network, tutors ESL at Esperanza Center, and participates in the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Team.

Argo Duenas, an Annapolis native is the founder and owner of Back to Nature Health & Wellness Center, LLC, as well as a certified colon hydrotherapist, foot reflexologist, and Reiki practitioner. Duenas is a member of the International Association for Colon Hydrotherapy and the NAACP. Previously, she was a member of the American Business Women Association, the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Awards Dinner committee, served on the board of the Opportunities Industrialization Center of Anne Arundel County.

Argo Duenas, an Annapolis native is the founder and owner of Back to Nature Health & Wellness Center, LLC, as well as a certified colon hydrotherapist, foot reflexologist, and Reiki practitioner. Duenas is a member of the International Association for Colon Hydrotherapy and the NAACP. Previously, she was a member of the American Business Women Association, the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Awards Dinner committee, served on the board of the Opportunities Industrialization Center of Anne Arundel County.

Comcast Holds Baltimore City Internet Essentials Enrollment Event

Comcast partnered with Weinberg Place to hold an Internet Essentials enrollment event on Wednesday, September 19, 2018, where the company offered eligible residents the opportunity to sign up for its Internet Essentials program.

The program provides low-cost, high-speed Internet service for $9.95 a month plus tax; the option to purchase an Internet-ready computer for under $150; and multiple options to access free digital literacy training in print, online and in person.

As part of Comcast’s commitment to bridge the digital divide, the company announced last month it has now connected more than six million low-income Americans to the Internet through the program.

Since 2011, Comcast has invested more than half a billion dollars to support digital literacy training and awareness, reaching more than 8.5 million low-income Americans.

BGE ‘Bright Ideas’ Teachers’ Grants Now Being Accepted

— BGE is now accepting applications for the 2018 Bright Ideas Teachers’ Grants program. All kindergarten through 12th-grade in-classroom teachers within the BGE service area focusing on innovation, science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), the environment or energy efficiency are eligible to apply at www.bge.com/giving. Applications must be received by October 31, 2018.

Eligible teachers can receive a grant of up to $500 for in-classroom use to fund eligible projects. Some projects previously funded include a robotics club where students meet to design a VEX IQ robot and invention kits that incorporate STEM by turning everyday objects into touch pads. Grant winners throughout BGE’s service area will be announced in November. The grant program launched in 2017 and awarded a total of $25,000 to 54 teachers.

“At BGE, we remain focused on a commitment to education, especially in the areas of STEM and innovation,” said Valencia McClure, vice president of governmental and external affairs and corporate relations for BGE. “This second-year grant program provides teachers the opportunity to prepare students for the future by challenging them with STEM enrichment activities.”

BGE provides $1 million annually for education programs across its central Maryland service area through its charitable contributions programs. The company has also provided more than $300,000 to winners of BGE’s energy safety programs for children: The Wires Down Video Challenge for electric safety and Captain Mercaptan Natural Gas Safety Contest.

Since its founding in 1816, BGE has partnered with Maryland communities to enhance our neighborhoods.

For more information about the Bright Ideas Teachers’ Grants program, visit: www.bge.com/giving.

Anne Arundel Community College Receives Higher Ed Diversity Award

Anne Arundel Community College (AACC) has received the Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award for the third year in a row. The award comes from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, the oldest and largest diversity-focused publication in higher education.

This award is the only national honor for U.S. colleges and universities that demonstrates an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion. AACC, along with 95 other recipients, including four other community colleges, will be featured in the magazine’s November issue.

“We are starting to transform our culture at AACC. Equity is the focus – as an institution, everything we do, from learning, operations, policies and procedures – it is through the lens of equity and the student experience,” said Dr. Dawn Lindsay, AACC’s president. “To receive this recognition for the third year in row is honoring the hard work of the faculty, staff and students at AACC. Though there is still more work to do, we are definitely on the right path.”

AACC’s Chief Diversity Officer Deidra Dennie agrees, noting that the award “is affirmation that we are doing the right things and showing great progress in building an inclusive, just and equitable campus community.”

INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine selected AACC because it has long been committed to a strategy that embeds the goals and values of diversity and inclusion into every office, department and function of the college.

Dennie says the college prides itself on preparing students to think and operate in a global arena, which is critical to encouraging student success and the growth of the region and nation.

“We firmly believe that promoting equity, diversity and inclusion is everyone’s responsibility,” she said.

The magazine takes a holistic approach to reviewing all applicants.

“The HEED Award process consists of a comprehensive and rigorous application that includes questions relating to the recruitment and retention of students and employees – and best practices for both – continued leadership support for diversity, and other aspects of campus diversity and inclusion,” said Lenore Pearlstein, publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. “We take a detailed approach to reviewing each application in deciding who will be named a HEED Award recipient. Our standards are high, and we look for institutions where diversity and inclusion are woven into the work being accomplished every day across their campus.”

For information about the 2018 HEED Award, visit insightintodiversity.com.

Cure For American Doctor Shortage Lies Abroad

Waiting at the doctor’s office could soon become a national pastime. One-third of America’s doctors are on the verge of retirement. Yet the number of students graduating from U.S. medical schools is growing at an anemic rate— less than 1.5 percent a year, on average, over the last five years.

The U.S. population will reach nearly 360 million by 2030. The number of elderly Americans, who require twice as much medical care as young people, will surge 50 percent. As a result, America could be facing a shortage of 121,000 doctors by 2030, according to a new report from the Association of American Medical Colleges.

To narrow that gap, the United States must look beyond its borders, to graduates of international medical schools. Many are U.S. citizens eager to return home to begin their careers. It’s time to welcome them.

For many, the doctor shortage has already arrived. Over 84 million Americans live in federally designated Health Care Professional Shortage Areas, where there’s less than one primary care physician for every 3,000 people. We’d need almost 14,000 extra primary care doctors right now to resolve this shortage.

Things are projected to grow worse over the next decade. By 2030, the AAMC estimates, we may need an additional 49,000 primary care physicians to meet the needs of our patient population.

Even if they enroll more students, U.S. medical schools won’t plug this gap on their own. Most graduates of U.S. schools pursue careers as specialists. Last year, only 38 percent chose residencies in primary care.

U.S. medical school graduates also tend to cluster in relatively affluent cities and suburbs. Only one in four practices in a medically underserved region. And just one in ten doctors practices in a rural area, even though 20 percent of Americans live in one.

Graduates of international medical schools have proven more than willing to fill these gaps. Last year, nearly 70 percent of international medical graduates chose residencies in primary care. IMGs are twice as likely as their U.S.-trained counterparts to practice in rural America.

Many of these international graduates are U.S. citizens who chose to pursue their medical studies abroad. For example, 74 percent of the students at the medical school I lead, St. George’s University in Grenada, are Americans.

It’s imperative that America’s leaders ensure that graduates like these can return home to complete their training.

At the national level, Congress could pass the bipartisan Resident Physician Shortage Reduction Act, which is currently stalled in the House of Representatives. The bill would fund 15,000 additional residencies— at least half of which would be in specialties experiencing shortages.

States can ease their doctor shortages by actively recruiting international medical graduates.

Consider one California initiative offered through the UCLA School of Medicine. Created in 2007, the International Medical Graduate Program offers financial support and tailored test-prep classes to doctors trained abroad as they prepare for the U.S. Medical License Examination and the residency match progress. In return,

program enrollees must pledge to complete a family medicine residency in California and then practice for at least three years in an underserved community.

Private-sector organizations and charities should also consider funding residencies, especially in underserved areas.

America’s physician shortage is set to worsen as the population grows and ages. International medical graduates could be the cure for this looming shortfall.

G. Richard Olds, M.D., is president of St. George’s University (www.sgu.edu).

The Braxton Brothers’ ‘Higher’ Jazz Album Rocks Superbly

It’s evident when you hear the new album, “Higher,” by The Braxton Brothers that they were born to complement each other— being twins help also. Nelson plays the bass (and lead guitar) and brother Wayne plays the saxophone.

Together they make the two sounds rock, superbly.

“He (Wayne) has a different way of looking at things,” said Nelson, when I asked what differences between the twins were musically. “He is more out the box— he is not trying to do what anyone is doing. He is fresh.”

Nelson, who has been on tour with Michael Bolton for 12 years, explains that he works with other artists so he has learned to adapt.

“I depend on that (Wayne’s out of the box style) to balance. He helps balance me,” Nelson said. “He works with other people too (Sheila E). What’s interesting is we still have the same music background.”

I think balance is a good way to describe why Wayne’s sax and Nelson’s bass (strings) work together superbly. The album also features lead guitarists Errol Cooney, Kay-Ta (LCR Music), Andy Quinn and Ryan Parrino. Both Nelson and Wayne offer skilled voices along with Joelobeack Neisler-Lebron.

“The record is made of music we made while living,” Nelson pointed out. “Music can uplift or bring them down. I hope listeners get joy from it and feel lifted from it— get up and do something. Feel inspired and loved.”

Well the “Higher” album sure had me wanting to get up and move my body. My favorite selections from “Higher” are #1 “The Only Woman in the World” because it’s upbeat and you are able to hear the great blend the two musicians create, and the lead guitar is the cherry on the cake; #3 “Back in My Arms” because it’s amazing the way that Wayne’s sax sings and Nelson’s bass dances and I love how they reach an explosive point; #5 “Something in My Heart,” because I immediately thought this song is so good that it belongs on a soundtrack; #6 “Because of You” because it has a Pop flavor added to their Jazz sound that is simplicity; #8 “Beauty” because it has a Reggae feel that makes you want to rock and the guitar strings on this is superbly done, and #11 “What Would I Do” because this time the bass sings – along with vocals that are perfectly blended.

For more information about their latest project, “Higher,” visit: www.TheBraxtonBrothers.com

Eunice Moseley is also a Public Relations Strategist and Business Management Consultant at Freelance Associates. She is also Promotions Director (at-large) for The Baltimore Times. For more entertainment news, visit: www.ThePulseofEntertainment.com.

Deborah’s Voice To Hold National Rally In D.C.

For 27 hours, Genelle Guzman-McMillan was trapped beneath the rubble at the World Trade Center following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2011. She had reported to the 64th floor of the north tower, and was racing down the stairs for her life when the building collapsed around her. Guzman-McMillan would be the final person found alive amidst the death and destruction of Ground Zero.

Guzman-McMillan, author of the book “Angel in the Rubble,” has a powerful story of faith and survival. She is among the inspirational women slated to speak at The Deborah’s Voice national rally on Saturday, September 29, 2018 from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

“Awake. Arise. Advance” is the call of the rally, which includes a dynamic line-up of women who have overcome incredible odds. The goal of the event is to bring awareness to human slavery and forced child prostitution.

Pastor Diane Mullins is the founder of Deborah’s Voice.

“Women who have been victimized by human slavery are very fearful,” said Pastor Mullins, co-Pastor of Calvary Christian Church in Hamilton, Ohio. “They don’t trust anybody. They have lost their identity, are hopeless, and very broken. On September 29, 2018, we want to let them know there are safe people and places to help them. We want them to see hope and that there are concerned people. We want to stand with them in unity.”

Deborah’s Voice represents Christian women from all walks of life with Judeo-Christian values. Their mission is to show the power of living a godly life in the 21st century; and to show the world that the God still loves the world. The organization provides a platform for Christian women that promotes and celebrates a Biblical worldview. Deborah’s Voice accomplishes these goals through engaging local, regional and national gatherings that includes speakers, testimonies, and uplifting music.

“Deborah’s Voice speaks to the voice of how women feel,” said Pastor Mullins. “We want to bring healing and hope to hurting women. We want to help them come out of their broken places.”

In addition to Guzman-McMillian, speakers will also include Dr. Barbara Peacock of Barbara Peacock Ministries; Gigi Graham, daughter of the late evangelist Billy Graham; New York Times Best Selling Author Rebecca Alonzo; and Dr. Marlene Carson, a human trafficking survivor and founder of The SWITCH Anti-Trafficking Network.

“We have all kinds of speakers,” said Pastor Mullins. “All of these women have come through something.”

Pastor Mullins has her very own testimony. On October 15, 1977, her father and her two brothers were killed in a plane crash. According to Pastor Mullins, the death of her father and brothers was such a traumatic experience she came to understand that she could run from the pain of the loss or depend on God to take her through the journey. She chose the latter.

“That day, God spoke to me,” she said. “I know pain. I really believe God told me to raise up a voice. I am amazing and humbled at what has happened this past year. I finally feel I have moved out of the wilderness. I am healed enough to help others through their pain.”

For over 30 years, Pastor Mullins has passionately preached the Gospel. With sound biblical teaching and preaching, she continues to empower multitudes to take dominion over their lives. She is a highly sought after conference speaker and author. She is married to Pastor Jim Mullins, and has two sons.

“Women enslaved in human trafficking have to make a choice,” said Pastor Mullins. “That’s the number one thing— making a choice. These women have to have the courage to get to someone who can help them. As long as they are silent, it is impossible. They have to step out and ask. We will be in Washington, D.C. to help them. It is possible to come out of human trafficking and be productive. Dr. Carson is such an example. We want women from all walks of life to come to Washington, DC and be a part of this dynamic event.”

The rally will also include performances by Eagle’s Rock Dance Team; A.I.M. Drama Team/Calvary Worship Team; Alexis Mahan; Dennis Wilson; Audrey King; and a dance performance by FERVENT.

For more information. visit: www.deborahsvoice.net.

‘Fresh Prince’ Star Puts Grace, Soul And ‘Mother Wit’ Into New Cookbook

For those who only know Daphne Maxwell-Reid as “Aunt Viv” from the smash 1990s hit comedy, “The Fresh Prince of Bel Air,” there is so much more to behold.

Maxwell-Reid, the wife of acting icon Tim Reid, started her career as a model and became the first African American to appear on the cover of Vogue magazine in 1969.

In addition to the “Fresh Prince,” which starred superstar Will Smith and the late James Avery, Maxwell-Reid appeared in the police drama “Hill Street Blues,” and the comedy hit, “WKRP in Cincinnati.”

She has also published several books on photography and now, her latest is a cookbook titled, “Grace, Soul and Mother Wit: A Cookbook Spiced with Personal Memories.”

“It’s about serving love through food,” Maxwell-Reid told the Baltimore Times. “Some of my favorite recipes are the ones my mother cooked when we were growing up and then when we came to visit. Each of them has a story, and what it means to me.”

The book contains original recipes that Maxwell-Reid previously wrote on her computer, which she says she gathered from loved. Her book also features numerous anecdotes and photos of her life when she was growing up, the majority of which were taken in the kitchen.

“My mother was very talented in a lot of different things and cooking was her the way she showed love,” Maxwell-Reid said. “Standing with my mother in the kitchen meant it was time that we shared conversations, what was going on in our lives and what was going on politically. It was my bonding time with my mother and I knew when it was time to serve food, it was going to be a celebration of life.”

Born in Manhattan, Maxwell-Reid now resides in Virginia.

She attended Chicago’s Northwestern University where she was named the school’s first African American homecoming queen.

A former model with the elite Eileen Ford Modeling Agency, Maxwell-Reid landed the cover of Vogue Magazine while attending college.

“It was to me just another day of modeling when I was at school and I had kind of a mentor named Amy Green who’d call me and say come to New York and I’d fly to New York,” Maxwell-Reid said. “She said to wear a red turtle neck and some mascara and lip gloss and sit near the window and that’s what I did, and I don’t think the photographer even used his full roll of film. I did the shoot, flew back to Chicago and later, I’m walking by the newsstand and saw my picture. They didn’t tell me. They didn’t say anything.”

Maxwell-Reid has remained busy since the “Fresh Prince” series ended in 1996. She was also busy before landing a role on that show, appearing in movies and television shows like “Coach of the Year,”

“Protocol,” and “Murder She Wrote.”

Most recently, she has appeared on UPN’s “Eve,” and BET’s “Let’s Stay Together.”

Along with several other projects and commitments that have kept her busy, Maxwell-Reid is busy with her cookbook.

“After publishing four books on photography and with people asking me when I would write my memoirs, I decided to get this off of my computer and to combine my memoirs with recipes,” Maxwell-Reid said.

She explains the three key words in the title of her new book, Grace, Soul and Mother Wit.

“Grace is hopefully the way I’ve lived my life. With grace and integrity and it’s what you say before a meal,” Maxwell-Reid said. “Soul is the community from which I sprung, and it’s the depth of love and culture that I carry from my ancestors. Mother Wit is something you’re either born with or get to learn. It’s innate intelligence that can be couched as common sense so [in the cookbook] I give you tools to have a little mother wit in the kitchen like how to set the table, what to have in your pantry at all times. as well as give you the richness of my culture and family.”

To purchase a copy of Maxwell-Reid’s new book, “Grace, Soul and Mother Wit: A Cookbook Spiced with Personal Memories,” go to http://www.daphnemaxwellreid.com/.

Chickie & Co. Boutique’s 4th Thursdays’ Event Features Brandi Lewis Pop-Up Shop

— Chickie & Co., one of Baltimore’s newest fashion boutiques will host its second 4th Thursdays’ event on Thursday, September 27, 2018 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 801 N. Howard on Antique Row in the Mt. Vernon neighborhood in Baltimore City.

Brandi Lewis of the House of Seyko will be featured with a pop-up shop showcasing her dynamic embellished clothing designs at the event, as well as shopping discounts, complimentary light refreshments and other surprises.

Chickie & Co. was featured in the “Savvy Shopping” section of the September issue of Baltimore Style magazine. The fashion-forward boutique for women offers original, industry separates from local and national emerging designers offering sizes from small to curvy— up to 3X.

“I am thrilled to continue with the second event in my 4th Thursdays’ series. I’m enjoying the opportunity to showcase my boutique, as well as to provide a space for local fashion designers like Brandi Lewis,” said Tracy McCullom, Baltimore native and owner of Chickie & Co. Boutique.

The 2,000 square foot store features all things chic, hot, cool and sexy with an artistic design aesthetic offering a curated selection of apparel, jewelry and handbags for women from a wide range of labels. The store also showcases recognizable contemporary brands in apparel, denim and accessories at a reasonable price point.

Chickie & Co. offers a concise shopping experience for women who like to be distinguished and who enjoy a comfortable and unique shopping venue.

The next 4th Thursday is scheduled for October 25, 2018, where a “Halloween Celebration Party” with tricks and treats, light fare and drink is planned. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet local jewelry artisan Lobe Dangle Leather Accessories who will available to customize eclectic pieces for customers on demand.

For more information about the Chicke & Co. boutique or their 4th Thursdays events, visit: www.chickieandco.com.